Moving to AWS (?) – Part 2

Continuing on with our journey into AWS from part 1 we now need to look at some cost estimates. We start by getting a list of storage and compute instance offerings from AWS.

Storage
Type Size Monthly Cost
S3 1 TB $23.55
S3 2 TB $47.10
S3-IA 1 TB $12.80
S3-IA 2 TB $25.60
EBS 100 GB $2.30
EBS 200 GB $4.60
EBS 300 GB $6.90
EBS 400 GB $9.20
Glacier 1 TB $4.09
Glacier 2 TB $8.19
Instances (reserved)
Type Monthly cost CPUs RAM (GB)
t2.nano linux $2 1 0.5
t2.micro linux $5 1 1
t2.small windows $16 1 2
t2.medium windows $34 2 4

One Windows server is needed for security cameras, and one Linux server to host a couple of websites and to run Subsonic for music streaming.
We also need about 1 TB of storage, and 1 TB for long term backups. Finally we estimate a daily transfer rate of about 1 GB in and out of AWS.

With these requirements in mind we can scope out three different configurations:

Configuration 1 Cheapest
t2.nano $3
t2.small $16
S3-IA 1 TB $13
EBS 100 GB $2
Glacier 1 TB $4
Data Transfer fees $5
Total $43
Configuration 2 Most likely needed
t2.micro $5
t2.medium $34
S3 1 TB $23.55
EBS 200 GB $4.60
Glacier 1 TB $4.09
Data Transfer fees $10
Total $81
Configuration 3 Match current cost
t2.small $16
t2.medium $34
S3 2 TB $47.10
EBS 300 GB $6.90
Glacier 2 TB $8.19
Data Transfer fees $10
Total $106

Because we have the ability to scale up if needed we can start with the small configuration 1. This will roughly cut my monthly costs in half, with the trade off being less compute resources and significantly less storage.

With our cost estimate and planned configuration in mind we can start drawing a design of our new infrastructure. We might also explore the option to run our web servers in individual containers instead of on a central server instance. This will happen in part 3.